WELCOMING OUR NEW CREATIVES IN RESIDENCE

We are delighted to announce our next pair of Creatives in Residence, Stephanie Lyttle and Cameron Carr, who will join us from July - September.

We continue our Creatives in Residence programme by welcoming two brilliant new creatives – poet Stephanie Lyttle and artist Cameron Carr – who will join us for a three month digital residency (although now that we are open again they both hope to visit in person!).

Throughout their residency, Stephanie and Cameron will take inspiration from Jane Austen’s life, works, home and legacy. They will create their own new pieces and also work together to share ideas, stories, imagery and a love of Jane Austen!

We can’t wait to see what they create!

Poet in residence: Stephanie Lyttle

Originally from Belfast, Stephanie moved to England to take up an Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded Creative Writing PhD at Newcastle University. Alongside this, she teaches undergraduate students and facilitates creative writing workshops for clients including Seven Stories: The National Centre for Children’s Books.

Her work spans prose and poetry for both young people and adults, focusing on issues of queerness, monstrosity, robots/AI, and the body.

She has previously won the Grierson Prize for Verse and been shortlisted for the Bridport Prize for flash fiction.

Stephanie Lyttle

Artist in Residence: Cameron Carr

Cameron is a young, award-winning autistic artist and animator. He has recently graduated from the University of Creative Arts in Farnham, where he studied animation.

During the pandemic, Cameron built a studio in his bedroom to enable him to work on a stop motion epic for his grad film called “Wawel Dragon”, an adaptation of a Polish folk tale. His dream was to popularise the beloved but otherwise obscure story outside of its Eastern European roots and share its culture with English-speaking countries.

In his early childhood, Cameron was non-verbal and could only communicate through drawing, which led him to develop his passion for animation. He has won awards for his autobiographical animation “Strange”, now distributed in Canada and the USA.

Commercially, he has worked on projects for the BBC and the NHS. Currently, he is collaborating on a feature-length documentary.

Cameron Carr